TRAVEL JEWELLERY – wish travel-lovers safe journey and luck

Travel jewellery bracelet girl

Jewellery for travel lovers – is there such a thing? Travel-inspired jewellery? Wanderlust jewellery? Safe travel jewellery, like a safe travel necklace, for example, and jewellery to wish a safe journey is common these days. Why? What makes the best travel jewellery gift? Read on:

Travel talismans and amulets have existed for centuries – the most popular Western figurehead of travel probably being St Christopher, often depicted on safe travel necklaces and bracelets. But other talismans for safe travel feature Runes, lucky Gemstones and Crystals, Compasses and World charms – even depictions of Noah, mankind’s original travel icon, fleeing danger in his Ark.

Noah had a travel talisman
Noah had a travel talisman on his Ark

See our Good Luck Gift shop for  JEWELLERY to WISH LUCK / SAFETY on a TRIP  . .

But apart from St Christopher, how much travel inspired jewellery features or depicts something with provenance that people have put their faith in for centuries? For example, simple Latin crosses; other Christian Saints like St Michael, St Benedict or indeed, the Camino cross of Saint James (or its associated Scallop shell way-marker symbol often seen along the Camino de Santiago (Way of St James)). And we mustn’t forget the children’s favourite, the ever-present Guardian Angel.

Much folklore, legend and superstition surrounds travel jewellery: Safe travel charms are as old as Noah’s Ark itself. Some are even USEFUL when travelling: Noah is said to have hung a huge crystal of garnet on the bowsprit of his Ark to light the way ahead and deliver him and his crew to safety from the Great Flood.

Our Travellers Cross Whistle makes a great travel necklace gift for a friend or loved-one going on a journey (or a Gap Year, for example) because it combines the symbol of the cross of St James (or the scallop shell) engraved onto the silver) combined with an actual safety whistle that can be sounded in an emergency by blowing. The one featured here is made of 925 sterling-silver, so it would make a substantial and momentous gift for someone travelling.

Apart from a travel necklace adorned with safe travel charms (or well-known and respected protection charms like St Christopher, St Michael, or a Guardian Angel for example), travel jewellery rings are also common as gifts when someone is going away on a journey . . to wish them well and a speedy and safe return home.

The best jewellery for travel and for travel-lovers has both meaning and gravitas, i.e. it has REAL significance: That is to say, in addition to any value that the travel charm symbol has in itself, or the religious faith that it might represent, it can also act as a reminder to be careful when travelling: And this can be a powerful aid to staying safe whilst away from home.

See some GOLD and SILVER NECKLACES for LUCK and SAFEKEEPING  in our shop

In Spain they have the lucky Indalo as a protector from harm; In Western Asia and parts of Europe, Africa and Latin America they have the Evil Eye; In the Middle East and North Africa they have the Hamsa – also known as the Hand of Fatima to Jews; and so on. The list is long, so the important thing is to find something that the recipient of a travel jewellery gift actually BELIEVES in . . something in which they can trust.

And remember, a travel talisman is said to bring good luck, whereas a travel amulet is intended to ward off evil or bad luck when on a trip.

See some  BRACELETS gifted to PROTECT  in our Good Luck Gift Shop

In the 21st Century, we are still superstitious about good luck, bad luck and misfortune: We are as mindful of luck and good fortune today, as our ancestors were hundreds (even thousands) of year ago. Indeed, so many people avoid the number 13, for example, that it is often absent from the floor of a hotel or the seat number on an aeroplane. The tradition of touching wood (or ‘knocking on wood’) dates back thousands of years . . and yet we still do it.

Wanderlust jewellery with a “good luck’ and “safe travel” meaning is as popular today as it was 500 years ago – perhaps more so. The St Christopher charm as a piece of safe travel jewellery is a very common gift – on travel necklaces, travel bracelets and other travel inspired jewellery, as is the Camino bracelet with the Scallop Shell talisman.

We have lots of of safe travels bracelets, necklaces, charms and other jewellery – and, if your friend of loved-one is thinking of going on the Camino de Santiago in France/Portugal/Spain, we sell a lot of travel memory necklaces related to the Way of St James – and life’s camino in general.

See our Good Luck Gift Shop for  EARRINGS for LUCK and SAFEKEEPING  travelling on a journey

So, in conclusion, what travel jewellery gifts are best? Nothing too expensive (because they’re travelling!); Nothing too cheap or tacky (it’s a gift, right!); And something with REAL meaning; Something that will last.

We think that we have found the perfect offering in our online Good Luck Gift shop enabling everyone to find something suitable for their friend, loved-one or work colleague who is going away on a journey – to wish them luck and safety along the way. For example, our unique safe travel necklace featuring a Travellers Cross whistle marked up with the Cross of Saint James (which is a great symbol for travellers) or la Vieira Concha – the Scallop shell symbol of El Camino de Santiago (possibly the greatest journey in the world). Yes, we really do offer the best jewellery for travel – meaningful, practical, prestigious and affordable . . great necklaces for travel lovers, bracelets for someone’s special camino . . a travel talisman with real significance – travel jewellery WITH MEANING.

See our shop for Travellers Cross Whistle: Safe travel jewellery with a practical use: If you get in to difficulty, simply blow the whistle!

 

Santiago de Compostela and Feast of St James

Santiago_de_Compostela_Cathedral

Tonight’s the night . . in Santiago de Compostela! Ten interesting facts you didn’t know about Camino de Santiago and St James

On the evening of 24th July, in the Plaza del Obradoiro (the main square of Santiago de Compostela old town, to the west of the Cathedral), there is a mass display of fireworks (Fuegos del Apóstol) to mark the start of the main part of the fiesta dedicated to Saint James in, Galicia, Spain.

Camino de Santiago symbols

Santiago or Saint James, is the Patron Saint of all Spain. The annual Feast of Saint James (Día de Santiago) takes places in Santiago de Compostela on 25th July and is a public holiday in Galicia. The city is one of the most symbolic in Spain and, whenever you visit, you can be sure to see many pilgrims – religious ones as well as those who simply enjoy the scenic journey along the Camino de Santiago (mostly across northern Spain).

Many of the walkers or journeymen (or women) will carry the traditional walking staff and/or one of the three main symbols of “El Camino” – the St James Cross (Cruz de Santiago), the Scallop Shell (la Concha de Vieira) or the yellow Waymarker symbol).

See some of the symbols on  CAMINO de SANTIAGO JEWELLERY – JOYAS del CAMINO  in our store online

Each year, some 200,000 people travel the Camino from all over the world: Some walk, others travel by bike. Many travellers choose to do the Camino for personal, rather than any spiritual or religious reasons – taking time out from their busy modern lives and perhaps finding inspiration along the way, whilst reflecting on their life in a supportive environment. Everyone experiences the journey in a different way.

Souvenir of Camino Santiago and Jewellery with meaning

At the journey’s end, when they arrive in the capital city of Santiago de Compostela (and more especially, at the Cathedral) most will hope receive their “Compostela” – the official recognition from the Pilgrim’s Office in Santiago that they have successfully completed the Camino.

See some  JEWELLRY with MEANING and SOUVENIRS of El CAMINO de SANTIAGO  in our online shop

Many visitors will try to arrive in Santiago in the days leading up to 25th July, which is both the Día de Santiago and the Día de Galica, Galicia’s regional day.

Saint James is believed to have visited Spain to preach Christianity and, when he was martyred in the Middle East, his body was thought to have been transported by boat to the Galician coast. His remains were discovered around 800AD, by a hermit following the path of star into a field – thereby giving us the name ‘Compostela’ (literally, the field of the star).

So, if you are lucky enough to be in Santiago today or some time soon, don’t forget to look out for the “Botafumeiro” – a huge incense burner that is swung back and forth down the Cathedral aisle during official masses like the one today which is usually attended by members of the Spanish Royal family and the Galician government. It weighs around 80kg and it takes eight people to swing it!

Souvenir of Spain

If you are unable to bring back a souvenir of this great experience (both a souvenir of Spain as well as a souvenir of Camino de Santiago), or perhaps you would like to give a little memento of Camino de Santiago to a friend or loved-one, we have many such gifts in our shop online: See some  CAMINO de SANTIAGO GIFTS  in our store.

¡Buen Camino! Ultreia, suseia, Santiago

 

LUCKY GIFTS

Gift for good luck

Did you know that over a third of people believe in luck (according to a YouGov survey) and a similar number consider that “touching wood” or “knocking on wood” will avoid bad luck?

Amongst sportsmen and women, this figure is much higher – especially on the big day of an event, competition, match or test / exam.

See Lucky Gifts for a special event or occasion in our   Good Luck Gift Shop store   online

If YOU are looking for a lucky gift . . you are not alone! At any one time, up to 30% of shoppers are looking to buy a gift (£1bn+ in sales, in the UK alone) and of those, 10% are shopping to buy a “good luck gift” – that’s a lot of good luck sentiment looking to buy something to pass on wishes of good fortune to a friend or loved-one in their latest venture, event or occasion.

Lucky elephant necklace

Many politicians, actors and sports people in particular like to carry a lucky charm, talisman or amulet, or keep one in their car, house or office. But they are not the only people who believe in good luck symbols and charms: Millions of us like to put our trust in little good luck talismans to attract good fortune (or amulets to ward off bad luck). It’s probably all down to superstition: For example, so many people avoid the number 13 in the Western hemisphere, that it is often absent from the floor of a hotel or the seat number on a plane.

The truth is, that behind many of our beliefs, there is a long history of superstition to which many people feel compelled to adhere. For example, the tradition of touching wood for good luck, dates back thousands of years when trees and Mother Nature were perceived as having a special connection. Even these days, there are few people who will openly tempt fate. This is because they sub-consciously believe that Fate is lurking out there somewhere, and they don’t want to attract her wrath.

Carmina_Burana_wheel_of_fortune
The wheel of fortune – an ancient belief

In Greek and Roman Mythology, Fate was in fact THREE goddesses who presided over the birth, and life of humans. Each person’s destiny was depicted as a thread – spun, measured, and finally cut by the three Fates: Clotho, Lachesis, and Atropos. On the other hand, Lady Luck is said to be the personification of GOOD luck, a version of Fortuna (or the Greek goddess Tyche) who was the goddess of fortune and the embodiment of luck in Roman culture. Fortuna is often depicted holding a ship’s rudder, a Rota Fortunae (wheel of fortune, first mentioned by Cicero) and a Cornucopia (horn of plenty). However, even Fortuna represented life’s capriciousness and could bring good luck and bad in equal measure because she was also a goddess of fate.

Lucky gift Pig ceramic
Even the Pig is considered lucky in some cultures

So, over the centuries, the concept of luck has been important and even today millions of people genuinely believe that some sort of good luck charm will bring them good fortune and prosperity, and that it will keep misfortune at bay. In fact, it has been proved in scientific experiments that it is this BELIEF that makes them have good luck or bad.

The British Museum has a complete collection of lucky charms and talismans dating back centuries. Some of the most powerful people in the world have believed in good luck charms: President Roosevelt carried one in his jacket; Napoleon carried a lucky coin; and during his election campaign, Barack Obama carried an array of good luck charms in his pocket. Michael Jordan, the famous Chicago Bulls basketball star, spent his entire NBA career wearing his old University of North Carolina shorts under his team shorts – for good luck.

Lucky Indalo travel charm bracelet
Indalo mojo bracelet

Lucky gifts

So, yes, people like to have so-called ‘Lucky Charms’, and giving one to a friend or loved-one can be a smart idea because, overall, most people are mindful of Lady Luck and are often looking for ways to appease her. To make sure that your Lucky Gift goes down well, it would be wise to listen to the words of Tennessee Williams: “There’s real power in a thought made positive or concrete by a lucky charm”. Yes, lucky charm gifts really can help people’s dreams come true, and a gift for good luck that has real meaning will almost always be a success.

We have a great many good luck charms / symbols and LUCKY GIFTS in  The Good Luck Gift Shop store . .

Our good luck gifts are based on ancient faiths, talismans, and symbols . . the sort that have helped people for many years. People have put their faith in these beliefs for centuries: And our gifts help people to have this belief. They have real provenance and derivation.

The simple lucky clover:

It is believed that the meaning of clovers pre-dates Christianity, going back to a time when clovers were used as Celtic charms. The Celts once extended across Ireland and into much of Western Europe and the Celtic priests, the Druids, considered them a sign of good luck, allegedly protecting against evil spirits and warding off evil / bad luck.

Lucky clover necklace

According to legend, the four leaves of a Lucky Clover represent hope, faith, love, and luck because, in Irish Christian tradition, the Shamrock (or 3-leaf clover) represented the Holy Trinity: one leaf for the Father, one for the Son and one for the Holy Spirit. When a Shamrock has a fourth leaf, it represents God’s Grace, and so encapsulates everything that a person could want.

The ubiquitous lucky horseshoe:

The Horseshoe is probably the most commonly recognised good luck symbol in the Western World. The combination of luck, protection, religion, and magic that is captivated by the Horseshoe symbol means that many people believe it will bring them good fortune – and help to ward off evil.

Lucky horseshoes jewelry

Man has long believed that the crescent-shape was a powerful protective talisman: For the Greeks, it symbolised the moon with links to Artemis and Diana. In olde England, St Dunstan nailed a horseshoe to a horse when working as a blacksmith. But the horse was actually the Devil in disguise and it caused the Devil great pain. St Dunstan only agreed to remove the shoe after the Devil promised never to enter a house with a horseshoe. And so, the symbol of protection arose.

Lucky gemstones:

For years, people have thought that certain gemstones have magical powers. e.g. Jade is supposed to promote longevity; Rose Quartz to attract love, and Carnelian is believed to bring courage.

Lucky Indalo and Amethyst gemstone charm bracelet

Back to Cleopatra and beyond, gemstone jewellery has been worn for their supposed magical powers . . to help protect people, bring them prosperity and good luck, as well as good health, longevity . . even love, and to help them to succeed. It has been scientifically proved that this belief brings people better fortune in their lives.

Religious symbols for good fortune

Many people believe that religious symbols can bring them good fortune. For example, on the famous Camino de Santiago across northern Spain it is common to see people carrying the Scallop Shell symbol – la concha de vieira . . an expression and reflection of their faith perhaps, but also for some, it has been give them as a lucky gift to wish “buen viaje” or “buen camino” or “good journey”.

Many also carry with them the cross of St James, the Travellers Cross – believed to promote faith and good fortune.

Lucky cross for travellers
Lucky cross for travellers?

Not all lucky gifts are the same. But one thing is certain: The gifts for good luck in our shop are designed to be just that: Gifts to pass on good fortune – items for the home or office that are genuinely believed to be lucky – possessing provenance and real, genuine character that really DOES mean something, and usually featuring symbols that people have put their faith in for many years.

Make sure that your lucky gift has real provenance / derivation. If it doesn’t, it’ll just be another meaningless gift to fill up the mantlepiece shelf.

Now that you know it’s best if a lucky gift has real meaning, you’re ready to find that ideal and magical gift for good luck that features in our shop

 

MOJACAR, fiestas and the INDALO SOUVENIR

Travel to Mojacar: 3 feverish days of fiesta to experience southern Spain at its best, and witness the lucky Indalo souvenir

Mojácar’s Festival of Moors and Christians is one of the year’s most anticipated parties in the province of Almería, southeast Spain. People in the surrounding area (and from miles around too) live all year round in expectation of this spectacular event. It’s not that there aren’t other “fiestas de Moros y Cristianos” in the region (for example down the coast at Carboneras – or across the “border” into Murcia, at the famous town of Caravaca de la Cruz. It’s just that the Mojácar fiesta is – well, special.

Moors of Almeria
Courtesy: Adolfo Galache

The people of the town live all year round in anticipation of the event, with much planning, making of costumes, and organisation of the groups and associations called kábilas and barracks. And the many foreigners of the area join in with gusto. But . .

Where is Mojacar? What is the the point of the Fiesta of Moors and Christians? Which part of Spain is Mojacar?

Mojácar is a small town on the coast of Almería in the south east corner of Spain. It is called a “hilltop” town because the large old quarter that sits atop a hill. But nowadays there is a substantial beachside area too with many bars and restaurants, and discos – as well a shops selling souvenirs, jewellery, and ceramics of Andalucía . . as can be seen also in our online Good Luck Gift Shop store .

What part of Spain is Mojacar hilltop village

Mojacar festival

By day, Mojacár is a quiet Andalusian village on the Mediterranean coast, with narrow cobbled streets, and the beach-side resort that stretches for some 7 miles with beautiful sand and warm waters. But at night in the late spring and summer . . the town comes alive with fun and frivolity . . and no more so than during the Fiesta de los Moros y Cristianos in June. People dress up (and the Spanish love “las disfraces” – costumes), either as Arab/Moors or as “Christians”. The reason is that, for around 600 years, Spain was more or less under Muslim control as the Moors moved north through the country. But they never quite succeeded in a complete takeover, being finally thwarted in the north, with areas of Galicia, Asturias and Navarra holding on with their Christian beliefs, and the The Catholic Monarchs (Queen Isabella I of Castile and King Ferdinand II of Aragon) finally beginning the re-establishment of Christian influence that the great El Cid (Rodrigo Díaz de Vivar) had begun 400 years earlier. By then, the country was a melting pot of races and religions (including a large population of Jews) and many lived in complete harmony. But there were endless scirmishes between Moors and Christians as the Moors were pushed back south – and many ‘border’ towns’ like Caravaca and Mojácar had constant battles.

Mojacar fiesta of Moors and Christians

So, the fiesta of Moors and Christians re-enacts these battles with half the people dressing up as Moors – and the other half as Christians – in a delightful display of colour. All is friendly: But it wasn’t always so: And many residents still see themselves as “Moors” despite the country having been “re-united” a long time ago (from the 15th Century under Los Reyes Catolicos) and some still feel very strongly about their history:“I am as Spanish as you”, says one dressed-up ‘Moor’, “but my race has been living in Spain for more than 600 years. I have never raised arms against the Christians. I therefore believe it is fair that you treat me like a brother, not like an enemy, and that you allow us to continue to work our land.” He added: “Before handing myself over like a coward, I will die like a Spaniard” (a reference perhaps to the final exit of the Moors from Spain, after defeat outside Granada, when Boabdil (Abu `Abdallah Muhammad XII (1460 – 1533), the last Nasrid ruler of the Emirate of Granada in Iberia) looked back at the great walled city with its Alhambra . . as he left for the last time – with the words of his mother Aisha ringing in his ears: “‘Weep like a woman for what you could not defend like a man.” This re-capture by the Spanish of the Granada Emirate in 1492 resulted in the final expulsion of “Los Moriscos” from España. It was over . . but not forgotten.

Abandoned Moorish costume

Each year, on the first day (Friday) of La Fiesta de Los Moros y Cristianos there is a gathering of “trabuqueros” outside Mojácar’s Town Hall, followed by an assembly of ‘troops’ at La Fuente (the town water fountain), and subsequent delivery of the keys to the ‘city’ by the “King” of the Moors, to the Christian King.

As this is Spain, where any excuse for a party is heeded, the whole process is re-enacted in the evening, and several times – often late into the night, over the next couple of days (and nights). The participants (and attendant crowd) climb to the top of the town and announce the presence of hostile troops in the vicinity of the city, accompanied by bands of music, fireworks and rifle salvoes. The troops then enter the town and attend a bonfire, with the inevitable party until dawn.

Moors and Christians Mojacar
Courtesia del Ayuntamiento de Mojaacar

On Saturday – everyone heads to the beach – why not?! for a repeat performance and mock battles (with lots of alcohol consumed – as the night before) Why? Because Moorish reinforcements have arrived of course! So they march to the Chiringuitos on the beach, dance and there is another battle and show of fireworks before they return to the hilltop village for more partying “hasta que salga el sol” (until sunrise).

On Sunday (hangover or not) it all starts again – with more riflemen with blunderbusses on the beach and finally an impressive evening parade of Moors and Christians, in full regalia and with weapons drawn, accompanied by numerous bands and fanfares.

Mojacar nightlife

There are no victors nor losers, and the essence of these Muslim, Christian and Jewish believers is one of mutual respect, and to live in peace together for another year in Mojácar.

Mojacar souvenirs, and what is the Indalo man of Mojacar?

In our  SHOP  , we have a range of souvenirs from Mojácar – in particular featuring the local symbol:  Indalo Man , which is said to offer protection and good luck, and be a great gift from Spain. This Mojacar souvenir features on jewellery, ceramics and other giftware.

You can see  Indalo gifts  and souvenirs from Mojácar in our central store.

Some of the   Indalo jewellery   pendants and necklaces in our shop were developed as a souvenir of a great time enjoyed in the clubs of Mojácar. But because Mojacar is a bit of a party town (although by day, a quiet Andalusian village on the Mediterranean coast in the south east corner of Spain), these Indalo gifts can also act as a souvenir of a great time partying . . anywhere! And, because this little lucky charm – the Indalo, can be gifted as a good luck present . . a charm necklace to bring your friend good luck, it is now recognised in many parts of the world for this reason.

For centuries, the so-called “muñeco mojaquero” or Mojácar doll symbol (which later was to be called Indalo Man) was daubed in red clay paint on dwellings in the area as an act of faith to help protect houses from misfortune. The origin of this symbol has been linked to the Neolithic period in the province (and the local cave paintings in Vélez Blanco), although the eventual name “Indalo” comes from Almería’s cultural movement during the 1950s. It was at this time that a local archaeologist and painter Juan Cuadrado, (colleague of another artist, and the group leader, Perceval) learnt of the 5,000 year-old paintings in the cave of Los Letreros in nearby Vélez Blanco. Cuadrado offered his artistic representation of one of the paintings in the cave (Indalo-shaped) to Perceval, to be the logo of the artistic group to which they belonged. The name Indalo too was the inspiration of Cuadrado (since Indalecio was a common local name – after the patron Saint of the area, San Indalecio, a 1st Century missionary and Apostle). Cuadrado then suggested that their group of artists be named ‘Los Indalianos’.

What is the Indalo man
Large Indalo Man symbol see at Cuevas del Almanzora

So the Indalo Man symbol itself is pre-historic in origin but in its modern form (and there are various designs) it is now recognised as a lucky symbol of the whole region of Almería in Andalucía – and it is said to offer protection from misfortune. But its adopted home is really Mojácar and you see the symbol everywhere. Over many years, it has offered its residents the prospect of good luck and even today, it is strongly believed that a lucky Indalo will bring good fortune to the owner. To anyone who visits Mojácar, it is the only souvenir to have – or to send to a friend as good luck gift.

Many of our   Indalo necklaces, pendants and bracelets   have been fashioned and hand-crafted in Andalucía. The Indalo makes a great little gift – both as a celebration of nightlife, like that of Mojacar (and the surrounding areas of Vera Playa and Garrucha), and as a souvenir or memoir of Almería and other such places along this coast.

Mojacar women dress up too
Women dress up too for fiesta

If you can remember that special party or fiesta – especially if you enjoyed it on the warm beaches of the Mediterranean sea – partying until the early hours, and would like a more permanent reminder of the fun time, you could order one of our little Indalo charms. It could be a souvenir of a great time had by all.

You can see some   Indalo lucky charm souvenirs of Mojácar and Almería   in our central shop – as well lovely   inspirational jewellery  from other parts of Spain like the Caravaca Cross  of Murcia, and Camino de Santiago jewellery .

Travel to Mojácar in Spain to see La Fiesta de los Moros y Cristianos and get a lucky Indalo Man souvenir

 

What’s the best way to say HAVE A GOOD TRIP

Want to wish someone a good trip? But what does: Have a Great Trip mean? What does Have a Good Flight mean? And what about: Safe Travels? The Good Luck Gift Shop has gifts to say this.

Have you ever tried travelling on your own? If so, you’ll know that it can be difficult because you have nobody to support you, to help you when things go wrong. So what can you do? Find a mate, a travelling companion. But this is not always possible. Especially if we recall the advice of that great literary iconoclast, Jack Kerouac: “In the end, you won’t remember the time you spent working in the office or mowing your lawn. Climb that goddamn mountain!” …. You have to go!

But . . . why not take a little lucky charm to possibly help you along the way? We have a lot in our online  shop

Many people have found problems travelling alone. But very few regret that they did it . . they tried. However, there are perhaps a few things that you should know before you buy your travel ticket and set forth on the “journey of a lifetime” in order to ensure the best (and most enjoyable) result: But this post won’t tell you what you need to do to make sure everything goes well, NOR will it let you succesfully plan the best trip . . EVER!

But, perhaps it can allow you to help a friend / loved-one? . . to wish them well on their OWN journey, by pointing you in the direction of some little gift that you can send them to say: “Have a good trip”, “Safe travels”, “Happy holidays”, “Have a wonderful time”

We sell lots of travels gifts for luck on a trip / travelling in our online shop , to enable you to find that “little something” for a friend to take with them as a REMINDER of their aims, goals and desires…. a little travel gift to wish good luck.

If you ARE looking for that little travel gift for a friend or loved-one travelling, the best place to go to ensure that you end up with something that lets your friend or loved-one know that you really care and that you are thinking about them, is our online shop (especially jewellery):

Jewellery to wish luck and safety on a trip

This is the best way to say “Have a good trip”

At Good Luck Gifts, we know a thing or two about good luck travel gifts – especially ones intended to pass on your wishes of safekeeping. We have been involved for over 10 years. Many of them are related to one of the greatest journeys of the world – el Camino de Santiago in Spain (our home), and many have Christian subtleties which might be pertinent to a friend or loved-one’s journey. So, ensure that your gift is symbolic and meaningful so that you can pass on your very best wishes.

Any good gift with meaning should let someone know that you really DO care about them. This is important because meaningless gifts are just that .. meaningless!!

¿Is Spring the time of year for people to go on their holidays? In the northern hemisphere, no, it’s more business trips perhaps, (at least until Easter) rather than the happy holidays of summer and families. In the southern hemisphere, as autumn approaches, the holidays draw to an end. So, if a friend or loved-one is going travelling, it is more likely to be a business trip: But this doesn’t stop you from wanting to say : “Buen viaje!” Have a great trip: Have a successful trip: Have a wonderful time! Wishes for a good trip or for a safe journey are timeless, season-less and international.

French novelist, Gustav Flaubert said that travel makes one modest: “You see what a tiny place you occupy in the world.” And celebrity chef, Michael Bourdain said: “Travel isn’t always pretty. It isn’t always comfortable. Sometimes it hurts, it even breaks your heart. But that’s okay. The journey changes you; it should change you. It leaves marks on your memory, on your consciousness, on your heart, and on your body. You take something with you. Hopefully, you leave something good behind” . . even if that is only footprints.

It is said that to travel is to live, and now that you know that not all travel gifts are equal … you’re no doubt ready to get that single, special gift that has REAL meaning for the friend or loved-one who is embarking on their journey of a lifetime, without worrying that it will be “suitable”.  Life is either a daring adventure or nothing at all.

The greeting amongst pilgrims on Spain’s El Camino used to be: “Ultreia, suseia, Santiago” (Go ahead, beyond Santiago). When one pilgrim greeted another by saying “Ultreia” (“keep going”) the other responded with “Et suseia!” (“and beyond!”). Nowadays, the more common greeting is “¡Buen Camino!” (Good journey).