New KEEP SAFE GIFTS to say TAKE CARE and BE SAFE

Keep safe gift to say take care

In May, 2020, The Good Luck Gift Shop announced a new range of gifts to say Keep Safe

You can see some of them in our  Safe Travel gifts / jewellery section  of our SHOP

And now, in July, as people begin to travel again after the reduction in risk levels of the virus pandemic, and the opening up of travel destinations / countries, many people are thinking about safety as they plan their holiday vacations and other travel trip journeys.

Take care and be safe

BUT, is it safe to go out and to travel again?

The answer to that question is, quite simply, who knows? Lots of people are still concerned about their safety. Will I be at risk of infection? If I get sick, will I have to miss work or school? Should I wear a mask? How often must I clean my hands? How close am I allowed to other people?

In consequence, it has become appropriate to offer friends and loved-ones suggestions and advice in these difficult times and sometimes a little ” Keep Safe ” gift as well to say  ” Take Care ” and ” Be Safe ” can be a good idea too.

Safe and sound – and secure

This is not only applicable to someone travelling – it can be equally relevant to someone going out into their local environment perhaps travelling to the shops for the first time in months – maybe after sheltering in place under the Stay Home, Stay Safe policy of many countries internationally. Many people (particularly the elderly) have become nervous about going out. ¡Quédate en casa! was the refrain in Spain. And it is not only religious or Christian jewellery that features in our SHOP:

Safe jewellery

For this reason, The Good Luck Gift Shop introduced a range of jewellery that would make an ideal gift to pass on a Keep Safe message to friends and loved-ones to perhaps help give them a bit of confidence and tell them that you are there for them and thinking about them.

Safe journey

So whatever a colleague’s plans on venturing out, whether going shopping in the supermarket for groceries, etc, going back work, or for leisure / holiday reasons, these jewellery gifts have symbolic meaning that can be passed on to friends and loved-ones as a meaningful present.

Gifts to say Take Care in our shop

Many of our new Keep Safe gifts are based on religious or Christian symbols and values, and so would meet the needs of spiritually-minded people who are looking for meaningful jewellery and other gifts in these strange times to pass on their message to Take Care and Be Safe.

Plese visit our  SHOP  to see more “Keep Safe” gifts

Jewellery / Gifts with Meaning . . it’s what we do!

 

When will CAMINO de SANTIAGO OPEN again?

Camino de Santiago route hostal open

The Camino de Santiago closed in March 2020 because of CoronaVirus, but the hopes and aspirations of the pilgrims and other travellers remain alive. So when will El Camino re-open?

For those walkers, pilgrims and other travellers hoping to travel this famous route some time soon, the general message coming out of Spain at the moment is: “Pilgrim – now is not the time . . The Camino can wait.”

When will LOCKDOWN end along El Camino in Spain?

Here at  The Good Luck Gift Shop we are keeping a careful eye on what is happening in the news coming out of Santiago de Compostela. For example, at the time of writing this article, both the Cathedral and the Pilgrim Office remain closed.

The Spanish Federation of Associations of Friends of the Way of Santiago is asking that everyone interested in walking the Camino should take “Individual Responsibility” and continue to follow the recommendations of the health authorities and “Stay at Home” with respect to COVID-19 CoronaVirus. They have produced a little video of many people connected with the Camino repeating the mantra: “Me quedo en casa – I am staying at home”. Indeed, the message throughout Spain is “Quédate a casa” (stay at home!) Now is not the time to walk El Camino de Santiago (anyway it is “closed” and you would receive a fine if you attempted it (that is, assuming you could even get into the area which is, like the rest of the Spanish peninsular, in “lockdown”. All the hostels, hotels, albergues and other “shelters” have been closed on all roads to Santiago.

So, “dear Pilgrim,” as the Authorities in Galicia say, “please calm your longing for the Camino until everything returns to normal”  It is better to travel safe than sorry.

BUT, people ask: When will that be?

When will El Camino re-open? When will flights resume to Spain?

If you want a realistic answer to this question, it looks like September at the earliest. “El Camino puede esperar” they say – but can you?

When will Camino de Santiago open again

Well, for one thing, there is a lot to be said for walking El Camino in the Autumn or September:

– It is less crowded

– There are milder temperatures than in the popular months of July and August – although good weather is no longer assured

– There is more accommodation available

So, as they say in Spain: “Ultreya!” (the response is Suseia!) (Onward! > Go further!)

In the meantime, “en solidaridad con los caminantes” we have produced a good luck necklace with the Yellow Arrow marker symbol of Camino de Santiago . . which could be given as a little gift of support for a disappointed friend who had to cancel their trip on El Camino this year (or postpone). We sell it at cost price (only the postage needs be paid):

Good luck necklace Camino yellow arrow symbol
To help keep the dream alive 🙂

More information about the feasibility of the Camino de Santiago route will be posted here as it becomes available.

Ultreya! Et Suseia! Buen Camino! El Camino WILL open again

STAY WELL GIFTS – KEEP HEALTHY, SAFE and KEEP the DREAM

Stay well keep healthy and safe

With the spread of Coronavirus, some people are cancelling journeys and others are looking for ways to pass on their best wishes to friends, relatives and work colleagues to say look after yourself, stay healthy and safe, and keep the dream alive

As a good luck gift shop, we have decided to highlight some of the  gifts  that we have in our online shop to support this idea. We are aware that this could be labelled as jumping on the bandwagon, but the reality is that we already have a lot of saddened and downhearted customers – those who had planned and prepared, for example, to walk Spain’s famous Camino de Santiago, and who are now confined at home instead. A simple little gift to people like this who are suffering disappointment cannot be a bad thing – and in fact, we would encourage it as a means of offering support . . which is, after all, what the Indalo Camino Good Luck Gift shop is all about.

Stay healthy wishes

“Stay healthy and safe” seems to be the massage of the moment with Coronavirus spreading worldwide, and people are understandably concerned about the welfare of their friends and loved-ones.

However, the approach of how to deal with this virus varies around the globe. Spain, for example has adopted the “Italian” approach – lock everyone up until it has “gone away”. In the USA, there is a rapidly developing situation: At the current time, the policy seems to be one of “checks and balances”.

But in the United Kingdom, things are, at the moment, a bit different: The UK wants the population to acquire “herd immunity”. Robert Peston, working for ITV writes: Herd immunity is what happens to a group of people or animals when they develop sufficient antibodies to be resistant to a disease. The strategy of the British government is to allow the virus to pass through the entire population so that we acquire this herd immunity, but at a much delayed speed so that those who suffer the most acute symptoms are able to receive the medical support they need. In this way, the health service is not overwhelmed by the number of cases it has to treat at any one time.

This seems like sound advice (based on scientific principles). As the World Health Organisation has conceded, there is no way now of preventing the virus sweeping across the globe. Mr Peston says that the kind of coercive measures employed by China in Wuhan and Hubei have simply locked the virus behind closed doors. As soon as the constraints on freedom of movement, etc, are lifted, the virus will return again.

School closures? Take care

School closures and the banning of mass events like football matches are not particularly recommended. It is argued that children themselves are the least at risk from the virus and, by closing schools they may become a channel of infection to older carers such as Grandparents. The UK government adds that this policy would massively deplete the manpower of hospitals and care homes, because vast numbers of medical staff would be forced to stay at home to look after their children.

Although the policy of keeping schools open has been labelled as “risky” by some experts, Professor Ian Donald, University of Liverpool, says UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s plan for the outbreak is based on the idea that low-risk people are actually meant to catch the virus. When enough people have this immunity it eventually limits the spread of the virus as it has fewer places to go. The population overall is then safe because it has an inherent immunity to it. He is quoted as saying: “The UK starting assumption is that a high number of the population will inevitably get infected whatever is done – up to 80%. As you can’t stop it, it is best to manage it.” Writing in the Daily Record, Tim McNulty reports that the aim of the UK is to have as many lower risk people infected as possible. Immune people cannot infect others; the more there are, then the lower the risk of infection. That’s herd immunity.

The Italian strategy is to stop as much infection as possible – or all infection. This is appealing, but then what? The restrictions are not sustainable. So they will need to be relaxed at some time. But that will lead to re-emergence of infections and climbing rates again. This is not a sustainable model and takes much longer to achieve an immune population.

Take care of yourself

At present, National Health Service England simply advises people to stay at home for seven days if they have Coronavirus symptoms such as a high temperature and/or a new, continuous cough. They also say: Do not go to a GP (Doctors’) surgery, pharmacy or hospital. (You do not need to contact the health advice line 111 to tell them you’re staying at home). They say, testing for coronavirus is not needed if you’re staying at home.

 

The NHS also advises:
– Wash your hands with soap and water often – do this for at least 20 seconds
– Always wash your hands when you get home or into work
– Use hand sanitiser gel if soap and water are not available
– Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when you cough or sneeze
– Put used tissues in the bin immediately and wash your hands afterwards
– Try to avoid close contact with people who are unwell
– Do not touch your eyes, nose or mouth if your hands are not clean

Wishing you well

So, if you feel inclined to send a little gift of condolences or well wishing, and to say keep safe, stay healthy – and keep the dream alive , please take a look at our  Store .

Happy wishes – keeping the dream alive

In particular, we have Christian gifts of faith – many based on the Way of St James / Camino de Santiago to help  Keep the Dream Alive .

We are shipping solely from the UK now and all Royal Mail services are functioning normally. You can see more information about our Store’s  Shipping Polices  here. Thanks for your support in these difficult times.

 

NEWS – CAMINO CANCELLED for CORONAVIRUS COVID-19

Cerrado el Camino

Trip cancelled? Help friends and loved-ones keep the dream of walking El Camino de Santiago (the Way of St James) alive

The Spanish Government has announced major measures against the Coronavirus which will impact heavily on those planning or wishing to walk El Camino de Santiago this year. And, in effect, at the moment, El Camino is closed.

Camino de Santiago closed?

In consequence of the spread of this COVID-19 virus, the hostels, albergues and other shelters along much and many parts of the Camino de Santiago are closed – as indeed is the Cathedral de Santiago itself, and the associated Pilgrim Office.

But most pilgrims and other travellers are keeping their faith and planning to achieve their goal of doing a Camino – and friend / relatives are busy consoling them and wishing them good luck in achieving their goal at a future date.

If anyone wants to send a small gift of condolence to a friend or loved-one who has had to cancel their long-planned Camino, we offer some little items in our shop online that could perhaps help them to  keep the dream alive  .

There is no escaping the fact that, even if someone is still intending to travel along Spain’s famous Way of St James, it would be extremely difficult at the moment – if not actually impossible. At the very least, the spread of COVID-19 over the Iberian Peninsular is causing a distinct lack of support services such as accommodation, as well as the issue of personal and community or social health and wellbeing.

Coronavirus has closed the Camino
Shattered dreams? Cortesía de la Oficina de Correos

Considerable alarm has now overcome the country, and especially in the northern regions of Spain which traditionally attract foreign visitors onto the Camino at this time of year (peaking after Easter) from all parts of the globe.

The overall situation will be reviewed again at the end of March – but things are unlikely to improve because the virus will not have run its full course – according to the experts. In fact, it could be at its height in April.

Pilgrims and other travellers or walkers who want more information about the feasibility of a journey along all the different routes should check with regional offices. (The Spanish health system’s Twitter accounts are also a good source of information).

Disappointment for Camino travellers – and Spanish hosteleros

To say that the Spanish are sad about the inconvenience this has caused to the pilgrims who are currently travelling (or who had planned to travel on a trip in the future) is an understatement.

And of course, the travellers or pilgrims themselves are also very upset by this latest news but, judging by the forums online, people are taking the news with some stoicism, realising that the decision has been taken for their own (as well as others’) safety.

Travelling Camino de Santiago
Empty Camino – Coronavirus has killed this famous route for early 2020

Much of the infrastructure of the Camino routes is being shut down and attempting to walk using the traditional routes would now be almost impossible. In effect, all such journeys are cancelled at the moment.

FICS issues official warning

FICS – La Fraternidad Internacional del Camino de Santiago issued an official notice on Thursday 12th March stating that “in the face of the recent events of the Coronavirus, and also of the responsibility we have to our pilgrims and volunteers, we advise all pilgrims not to undertake the Jacobean pilgrimage at the moment nor until the situation is normalised . . and to heed the warnings of the health authorities without question.”

On Saturday 14th March, the Spanish Government went a stage further by limiting the circulation or the presence of persons or vehicles at certain times and in certain places and limiting or rationing the use of services or the consumption of essential items. This is, in a word, lockdown, as we have already witnessed in Italy.

In the UK, the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) advises against all but essential travel to the regions that the Spanish Ministry of Health has designated as an area of community transmission of the Coronavirus.

The famous Cathedral in Santiago de Compostela is now officially closed, as is the attendant Pilgrim’s Office, and those arriving to receive their Credencial are being asked to leave a completed application form in a box outside. Cathedral Mass in English has been suspended until the Pilgrims’ Centre re-opens . . and nobody knows when that will be.

Keep the Camino dream alive

On a more positive note, many of the comments on the forums (in particular the caminodesantiago.me run by Ivar), have been more upbeat:

“Santiago will still be there in a couple of months!” says another.
“This is not a disaster, disappointing sure, and inconvenient, but this too will pass. Santiago will wait”
“The Camino isn’t going anywhere, it will be here waiting for a better time to walk.”
The Camino has existed for over a thousand years and will still be waiting for us in years to come.

But disappointment is palpable too: “I read this (news) with a very heavy heart as the older I get the less time I have to wait!” said one commentator.

If anyone wants to send a small gift of condolence to a friend or loved-one who has had to cancel their long-planned Camino, we offer some little items in our shop online that could perhaps help them to  keep the dream alive . Also see gifts to help achieve goals  in our online shop.

I read this news with a very heavy heart as the older I get the less time I have to wait

 

St MICHAELS WAY ENGLISH CAMINO in CORNWALL UK

Camino of St Michaels Way

The English Camino is called St Michael’s Way and it is in Cornwall, UK. It is not the same as El Camino Inglés which is a short Camino across the northern tip of Spain.

The English Camino was used by early Christian pilgrims (as well as other travellers) coming from Wales and Ireland who wanted to travel to Santiago de Compostela, but to avoid the treacherous and unsafe waters off the English coast at Land’s End, and thus arrive safely in La Coruña in northern Spain. They would leave their boats on the north Cornish coast near St Ives, walk the relatively short route across the peninsular to St Michael’s Mount and re-embark on other ships or boats to continue their journey by sea to northern Spain (and southern France).

See  CAMINO JEWELLERY  in our SHOP

Throughout Europe there are several pilgrim routes which lead to the Cathedral of St James in Santiago de Compostela, North West Spain – the third most important and religious place of Christian pilgrimage in the world. These are all collectively known as El Camino de Santiago de Compostela. But unknown to many is the St Michael’s Way Trail, in the county of Cornwall, on the southwestern tip of England, which is also one of these routes.

The Cornish Camino Celtic Way
Courtesy Google Maps

Safe travels – avoiding shipwreck!

This ancient path was used by travellers (and later by pilgrims and missionaries) to avoid crossing the dangerous waters around Land’s End, a notorious area off the Cornish coast said to contain more shipwrecks than anywhere else in the world. This overland route of early Christian travellers was one of the reasons behind the early conversion of Cornish people to the Christian faith.

See  JEWELLERY TO WISH SAFE TRAVELS  in our shop online

Little steps – a small adventure on the Cornish Celtic Way as an introduction to a full Camino

The St Michael’s Way (also known as the Cornish Camino or Celtic Way) is the only pilgrimage route in Britain that is officially part of a European Cultural Route, and it is a genuine British leg of the Camino to Santiago. It is only about 12 miles long but it connects five churches, four holy wells, two hill-forts, two standing stones, and two disappeared chapels, and is set in incredible scenery and unique countryside deep in the heart of Cornwall.

The Cornish Camino – a great introduction to a Spanish Camino

Walking the 20kms of St Michael’s Way now counts towards the 100km minimum required to receive one of the famed Compostelas (Pilgrim Certificates) in Santiago, when walkers arrive in the Pilgrim Office at the great Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela (where, it is said, lie the remains of St James the Greater . . hence the other name of this famous route: The Saint James Way). Once ashore in northern Spain, travellers can walk (or cycle) the relatively short Camino Inglés (from La Coruña into Santiago).

The English Camino – the Cornish Celtic Way

The British-based part of this Camino stretches across the Cornish peninsular from Lelant (near St. Ives in the north) to Marazion (near Penzance in the south) and covers around 12 miles of beautiful landscapes and spectacular scenery (including Carbis Bay – a UNESCO World Heritage Site). As is the norm in Spain, Portugal and southern France, the correct route to follow in the UK is indicated by the traditional Pilgrim’s symbol of a Scallop Shell (the symbol of St. James, because his remains, when discovered, were said to have been covered in these shells that are so common on the northern coast of Spain). In fact, a sort of stylised shell based on the Council of Europe’s sign for pilgrim routes is used with directional arrows in yellow for footpaths, blue for bridleways and red for byways.

Why not wish safe travels to a friend or loved-one going on a special journey, with a gift of Scallop Shell jewellery from our online shop, as well as other  GIFTS FOR LUCK and GOOD FORTUNE TRAVELLING  on a trip. It has deep sigificance that is based on the real history of the Camino.

As for St Michael himself, after whom this English Camino is named (as opposed to St James in Spain), more can be read here on our website:  GUARDIAN ANGELS and St. MICHAEL ARCHANGEL  . St Michael is one of the Guardian Angels (an Archangel) that is said to be a protector. He is also the patron Saint of Cornwall (as well as of the military and police too) and also, evidently . . of high places, which tends to explain why, if you ever discover a Church called Saint Michael, it is invariably located on the top of a hill.

You can also source jewellery and charms for protection with the symbol of  ST MICHAEL  Guardian Angel, in our shop.

Planning a full Camino de Santiago adventure? Good Luck!

Eventually, as you wind your way down to the coast and off the St Michaels Way, you arrive at your journey’s end in Marazion (before embarking for Spain, if that is what you plan to do). Here you will find yourself overlooking St Michael’s Mount (the Cornish counterpart of Mont-Saint-Michel in Normandy, France), an 8th Century monastery subsequently given to the Benedictine religious order of Mont Saint-Michel by Edward the Confessor in the 11th Century. Your English or Cornish Camino has come to an end – but it could be the beginning of something much grander – a full Camino de Santiago de Compostela . . in Spain!

¡Buen Camino!

 

PS: There is, in fact, another Camino in England: A 110km-long route from the ruins of Reading Abbey (founded by Henry I in 1121, and the centre of the cult of St James in England in the Middle Ages), to the port of Southampton, from where pilgrims also used to sail to France or Spain on their way to the tomb of St James at Santiago de Compostela. But this is even less well known than the St. Michael’s Way!